The 5 Best Free FTP Clients

Transferring files to and from your web host or server is best done with what’s commonly known an FTP client, though the term is a bit dated because there are more secure alternatives such as SFTP and FTPS.

When I was putting together this list, this was my criteria:

  • Supports secure file transfer protocols: FTP isn’t secure. Among its many flaws, plain FTP doesn’t encrypt the data you’re transferring. If your data is compromised en route to its destination, your credentials (username and password) and your data can easily be read. SFTP (which stands for SHH File Transfer Protocol) is a popular secure alternative, but there are many others.
  • Has a GUI: There are some awesome FTP clients with a command-line interface, but for a great number of people, a graphical user interface is more approachable and easier to use.

A Look at the Hourly Rates of Freelance Designers and Developers

Freelancers often struggle with how to price their services. There are many sites that offer salary data for full-time employees, but none that do so for freelancers.

We’ve managed to collect data about freelance hourly rates over at Bonsai, and we wanted to make it public, so we built Rate Explorer to make it easy for people to see our data on how much freelance designers and developers charge by the hour.

Can Handwritten Letters Get You More Clients?

At the start of last year, I was in a tight spot.

I’m a freelance writer, and my steady flow of work had slowed down and dried up. In February 2014, I made just over $7,000. In February 2015, however, I made just under $2,000. That’s a 70% pay cut when compared to the previous year’s earnings.

With my income declining rapidly to the point at which it was well below my cost of living — one of the tricky aspects of living in Tokyo is that it’s one of the most expensive cities to live in — I was forced to take action.

web-design

12 Small CSS Frameworks To Use In Your Web Designs

You probably don’t need most of the features that come with large UI frameworks such as Bootstrap, especially when you’re working on small, straightforward projects that you just want to get up and running as soon as possible. Fortunately, there are smaller, simpler CSS frameworks out there that you can use instead.

Using a small CSS framework typically translates to a gentler learning curve for developers, non-dependency on JavaScript for functionality, and faster load times for your users.

I’ve created an excellent list of small/minimalist CSS frameworks for you to explore. Most of them are under 5 KB (when minified and gzipped) and contain the essential ingredients for building responsive web designs.

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